Antoine Paccard

Research Professional in Genomic Studies

Curriculum

I am an Evolutionary Biologist and Molecular Ecologist currently working as Project Manager at the McGill University Genome Center.

APPOINTMENTS

- 2019-Present: Project Manager, McGill University Genome Center, Canada

- 2018-2019: Research Associate, McGill University Genome Center, Canada

- 2014-2018: Postdoctoral fellow, Redpath Museum and Dept. of Biology, McGill University, Canada

EDUCATION

- 2013: Doctorate of Philosophy, Evolutionary Biology. University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland

- 2008: Masters of Science, Biology, Grenoble Alpes University, France

- 2006: Bachelor of Science, Biological Sciences. Université Laval and Grenoble Alpes University

 

I describe below some of the most recent projects that I have recently been working on:

Detection of rare molecular variants

I am currently developing new methods in genomics to detect rare molecular variants of specific targeted regions. By combining the use or unique molecular identifiers with deep sequencing, we are able to detect mutations present at very low frequencies.

Main collaborator: Prof. Yasser Riazalhosseini

Parallel evolution in lake-stream stickleback populations at local versus global scales

Most studies assessing parallel evolution tend to focus on populations from a restricted geographical range, which biases the analysis because ecological environments and genetic backgrounds should be most similar on local scales. To examine how scale influences assessments of parallelism, I am quantifying phenotypic and genomic divergence for lake-stream threespine stickleback population pairs at local (Vancouver Island) and global (across North America and Europe) scales.

Main collaborators: Prof. Rowan BarrettDr. Dieta HansonDr. Yoel Stuart (UT)Prof. Dan Bolnick (UT) and Prof. Andrew Hendry (McGill)

Eco-evolutionary dynamics in threespine stickleback bar-built estuary populations

The bar-built estuaries of central California represent a unique system to study the effects of spatial-dynamics on natural populations. During the summer months, the estuaries are closed by a sandbar, creating brackish to freshwater lagoons. When it begins to rain in the winter, increased water flow fills each lagoon and the sandbar breaches. In a matter of hours the water in the lagoon drains out into the ocean. During this period, the estuary switches from being an enclosed lagoon to a flowing stream, allowing marine stickleback fish to colonise the stream. When stream flows weaken, a new sandbar will form at the mouth of the estuary, trapping the fish inside. We are collecting stickleback fish at different time points across spatially distinct estuaries in order to understand how fluctuating selection shapes the adaptive response. In particular, I am using RADseq to track signatures of selection reflected by patterns of sequence variation across time and space

Main collaborators: Prof. Rowan BarrettBen Wasserman (UC Santa Cruz)Prof. Eric Palkovacs (UC Santa Cruz) and Prof. Andrew Hendry (McGill)

 

Research

9. Paccard, A., Hanson, D., Stuart, Y.E., Berner, D., von Hippel, F.A., Kalbe, M., Klepaker, T., Skúlason, S., Kristjánsson, B.K., Bolnick, D.I., Hendry, A.P., Barrett, R.D.H. 2019. Repeatability of adaptive radiation depends on spatial scale: regional versus global replicates of stickleback in lake versus stream habitats. Journal of Heredity (President's Symposium Issue on Adaptive Radiation). doi:10.1093/jhered/esz056 [PDF]

8. Steven P. Brady, Daniel I. Bolnick, Amy A. Angert, Andrew Gonzalez, Rowan D.H. Barrett, Erika Crispo, Christopher G. Eckert, Dylan J. Fraser, Gregor F. Fussmann, Frederic Guichard, Thomas Lamy, Andrew G. McAdam, Amy E.M. Newman, Antoine Paccard, Andrew M. Simons, Andrew Hendry. Causes of maladaptation. Evolutionary applications. 12:1229–1242. [PDF]

7. Brady, S., Bolnick, D., Barrett, R.D.H., Chapman, L., Crispo, E., Derry, A., Eckert, E., Fraser, D., Fussmann, G., Gonzalez, A., Guichard, F., Lamy, T., Lane, J., McAdam, A., Newman, A., Paccard, A., Reale, D., Robertson, B., Rolshausen, G., Schulte, T., Simons, A., Vellend, M., Hendry, A. Understanding maladaptation by uniting ecological and evolutionary perspectives. American Naturalist 194:495-515. [PDF]

6. Derry, A.M., Fraser, D.J., Brady, S., Astorg, L., Lawrence, E., Martin, G., Matte, J.-M., Negrin Dastis, J., Paccard, A., Barrett, R.D.H., Chapman, K., Lane, J., Ballas, C., Close, M., and Crispo, E. 2019. Conservation through the lens of maladaptation. Evolutionary Applications. 12:1287–1304. [PDF]

5. Paccard, A., Wasserman, B.A., Hanson, D., Astorg, L., Durston, D., Kurland, S., Apgar, M.T., El-Sabaawi, R.W., Palkovaccs, E.P., Hendry, A.P., Barrett, R.D.H. 2018. How does extreme temporal variation shape adaptive traits and their potential ecological consequences? Stickleback armor in periodically breaching bar-built estuaries. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 31:735–752 [PDF]

4. Paccard, A., Van Buskirk, J., Willi, Y. (2016) Quantitative genetic architecture at latitudinal range boundaries: reduced variation but higher trait independence. American Naturalist 187: 1-11. [PDF]

 

3. Paccard, A., Fruleux, A., Willi, Y. (2014) Latitudinal trait variation and responses to drought in Arabidopsis lyrata. Oecologia 175: 577-587 [PDF]

 

2. Paccard, A., Vance, M., Willi, Y. (2013) Weak impact of fine-scale landscape heterogeneity on evolutionary potential in Arabidopsis lyrata. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 26: 2331-2340. [PDF]

 

1. Barrett, R.D.H., Paccard, A., Healy, T., Bergak, S., Schluter, D., Schulte, P.M. and Rogers, S.M. (2011) Rapid evolution of cold tolerance in stickleback. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 278: 233-238. [PDF]

 

Publications

Outreach And Interests

 

Press

Paccard, A., Van Buskirk, J., Willi, Y. (2016) Quantitative genetic architecture at latitudinal range boundaries: reduced variation but higher trait independence. American Naturalist 187: 1-11.

MolecularEcologist.com

Barrett, R.D.H., Paccard, A., Healy, T., Bergak, S., Schluter, D., Schulte, P.M. and Rogers, S.M. (2011) Rapid evolution of cold tolerance in stickleback. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 278: 233-238 :


ABC newsScience Centric, University of British Columbia

Outreach

Scientists have the duty to communicate their research to the general public. That is why I have made efforts to contribute to scientific education both in the field and in Montreal. I regularly do so through programs available at the Redpath Museum and through clubs such as the Mile End Science Club for kids.

Contact

McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Center. 740 Avenue du Docteur-Penfield, Montréal, QC H3A 0G1, Canada

(514) 398-4400, x094249

 

©2018 by Antoine Paccard

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